American Chemical Society – Feedback from Dallas

Patents at the American Chemical Society Meeting

I had the pleasure of attending last week’s American Chemical Society Meeting in Dallas Texas.  At the meeting, I had an expo booth, where people could visit with me and ask anything they wanted about patents.  First off, I was impressed with how patent savvy the community has become over the past decade.  When I was a PhD student from 2001-06, very few of us thought about patents.  Now, it seems like patents are becoming integrated into all levels of chemical research.

Below, I’ve summarized some of the most popular topics that I discussed during my time at the meeting.  For several of these questions, I have provided links to places with relevant information.  In some cases, I have already posted about these topics.  In two cases, I will need to prepare answers (“coming soon”).

This was Chadeayne LLC's expo booth at the American Chemical Society Meeting in Dallas

This was Chadeayne LLC’s expo booth at the American Chemical Society Meeting in Dallas. We had about 850 visitors.

American Chemical Society’s Patent Questions for Chadeayne LLC

These were the most popular patent topics discussed at Chadeayne LLC’s booth at the American Chemical Society meeting in Dallas:

These later two topics have a few especially interesting sub-topics, which I will follow up on soon.

For University Tech Transfer, I think the following topic is especially interesting: Ownership of the invention reverting back to the inventor after the University passes on the opportunity for patenting it.  In one sense, this give the inventor an opportunity to invest in 100% of the idea.  On the other hand, it seems to create an incentive to downplay the importance of the invention when disclosing it to the University.

For Idea Theft, I am intrigued by what would happen when someone steals an idea protected by a provisional patent application.  In theory, that thief would be developing the true inventor’s technology for free.  (After the true inventor asserts their patent rights, the thief would be left in a situation where any work performed on the invention benefits the true owner).  That would be poetic justice!

I will look forward to seeing everyone at the upcoming American Chemical Society Meeting in San Francisco.  In the meantime, please don’t hesitate to contact me if you have questions about patenting your chemical inventions.

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